Form Completion Questions in IELTS Listening

Learn about Form completion questions in IELTS listening with an overview, recommended strategy and practice questions.

the entrance to a hospital

Overview

Form completion questions test your ability to understand main ideas/facts in a recording.

Here are some key points about Form completion questions:

  • You’ll be asked to fill in gaps in a form. It’s much less common, but you could be asked to select from a list of possible answers instead.
  • Generally speaking, you don’t need to change the words used in the recording in any way – just write down the words as they are in the recording. However, if one of the answers is a date, you may have to make some minor adjustments so that your answer fits within the word/number limit.
  • You’ll hear the answers in order in the recording. That is, you’ll hear the answer to Question 1 before the answer to Question 2.
  • The questions are based on main points/facts that a listener would naturally write down. They aren’t based on obscure details.
  • In theory, they could appear in any part of the listening test, but they’re most likely to appear in Part 1.

Example questions

Here are some example Form completion questions relating to a conversation about volunteering in a hospital.

You can try these questions in the practice section.

Questions 1 – 5
Complete the form. Write NO MORE THAN ONE WORD AND/OR A NUMBER in each gap.

GORDON HOSPITAL
Volunteer Application Form

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Name Julie
Date of birth 1965
Availability Mondays and
Previous experience used to do volunteer work in a
Other languages spoken

Practice questions

Now it’s your turn to practise. Answer the Form completion questions using the steps outlined above.

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Questions 1 – 5
Complete the form. Write NO MORE THAN ONE WORD AND/OR A NUMBER in each gap.

GORDON HOSPITAL
Volunteer Application Form

↔  scrollable table

Name Julie
Date of birth 1965
Availability Mondays and
Previous experience used to do volunteer work in a
Other languages spoken

↕  scrollable window

Feedback

Click below for the answers and transcript.

The correct answer is “Steel”.

Here’s the relevant part of the recording:

JULIE: It’s Julie – Julie Steel.

PETER: Is that S – T – double E – L – E?

JULIE: Almost – just without the final E.

The correct answer is “August 17(th)” or “17(th) August”.

Here’s the relevant part of the recording:

PETER: And your date of birth? We just need it for our records.

JULIE: Of course – it’s August the seventeenth, 1965.

The correct answer is “Thursdays”.

Here’s the relevant part of the recording:

PETER: OK, thanks for that. Now, which days of the week would you be available? Just so you know – our volunteers work one day a week. But if you could tell me a couple of days that would suit you, that’d be great. I’ll be able to confirm what your day will be once I’ve spoken to the unit manager.

JULIE: Well, Mondays would definitely work. I look after my grandson on Tuesdays, so that’d be out, I’m afraid. Um, how about we put down Thursdays as well. I was about to suggest Fridays, but my husband needs the car that day, so I wouldn’t have any way of getting to the hospital.

The correct answer is “museum”.

Here’s the relevant part of the recording:

PETER: OK, great – I’ve noted that down. And have you done any volunteering before?

JULIE: Not a whole lot, to be honest. But I did help out a bit at the museum when I was at university – just answering the phones. Does that count?

The correct answer is “Polish”.

Here’s the relevant part of the recording:

PETER: Yes, definitely – I’ll put that down. Um, let’s see. Ah, yes – one more thing. We actually have quite a lot of patients from non-English-speaking backgrounds. I don’t suppose you speak any other languages, do you?

JULIE: Ah, well, I did six years of German at school – can’t speak a word of it now, though. But my husband’s from Kraków, so I’ve picked up a fair bit of Polish over the years. I’m actually fairly fluent now.

PETER: Good morning – Gordon Hospital – Peter speaking.

JULIE: Hi – yes, I’m calling to find out about volunteering at the hospital. I recently retired, you see, and I’d like to do something useful with the extra time.

PETER: That’s great – we’re always in need of volunteers. I’ll just need to take down some details. Could I start with your name, please?

JULIE: It’s Julie – Julie Steel.

PETER: Is that S – T – double E – L – E?

JULIE: Almost – just without the final E.

PETER: And your date of birth? We just need it for our records.

JULIE: Of course – it’s August the seventeenth, 1965.

PETER: OK, thanks for that. Now, which days of the week would you be available? Just so you know – our volunteers work one day a week. But if you could tell me a couple of days that would suit you, that’d be great. I’ll be able to confirm what your day will be once I’ve spoken to the unit manager.

JULIE: Well, Mondays would definitely work. I look after my grandson on Tuesdays, so that’d be out, I’m afraid. Um, how about we put down Thursdays as well. I was about to suggest Fridays, but my husband needs the car that day, so I wouldn’t have any way of getting to the hospital.

PETER: OK, great – I’ve noted that down. And have you done any volunteering before?

JULIE: Not a whole lot, to be honest. But I did help out a bit at the museum when I was at university – just answering the phones. Does that count?

PETER: Yes, definitely – I’ll put that down. Um, let’s see. Ah, yes – one more thing. We actually have quite a lot of patients from non-English-speaking backgrounds. I don’t suppose you speak any other languages, do you?

JULIE: Ah, well, I did six years of German at school – can’t speak a word of it now, though. But my husband’s from Kraków, so I’ve picked up a fair bit of Polish over the years. I’m actually fairly fluent now.

PETER: Ah, that’s impressive. I’d love to be able to speak another language! OK, that’s all I need for now. So, let me explain what our volunteers actually do at the hospital.